Category Archives: Marketing and Sales

Advertising, public relations, pricing, distribution, promotions, websites, galleries, shows and exhibitions

Galleries, Shows and Exhibitions – Art Gallery Contracts

Make sure you know what you are getting into before signing an agreement with an art gallery

Make sure you know what you are getting into before signing an agreement with an art gallery

In the previous article, Galleries, Shows, and Other Opportunities to Show Your Work I took a look at a variety of options to show and exhibit your work. In this article I will explore some things you should consider before entering into an agreement to show your work with a gallery or other third party venue.

Having your work shown in a gallery can be a great way to build your art brand and support your other marketing efforts. If you are represented by a gallery you are entering into an agreement between you and the gallery. As with any agreement it is important to know what you are getting into. The same goes for having your work shown on an online gallery as well.

Good business relationships are based on having a good understanding and an agreement of what is expected of all parties. I have heard from many galleries that artists are a “pain” to work with and an equal amount of artists that say that galleries are a “pain” to work with. My suspicion is that most of this comes from relationships forged on a lack of understanding of what is expected, who is responsible for what, and typically the lack of a formal written agreement.

A gallery agreement is a legal document

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Art Marketing – Selling Art Is Like Selling Potato Chips

Selling Art and Potato Chips Have a Lot More In Common Than You Might Think!

Selling Art and Potato Chips Have a Lot More In Common Than You Might Think!

I come from the business world. In over thirty years of business planning, marketing and research I have had the opportunity to work with successful (as well as my share of not so successful) startups to some of the world’s biggest and best known brands. These successful companies had a lot more in common than you might think. What they had in common was a grasp for the basics of marketing, consumer behavior and a good plan of action with the management to execute it.

When I was first asked to develop and teach the course Artrepreneurship at the Center for Innovation at Metropolitan State University of Denver to teach business to students in the arts I was excited but a bit apprehensive – I went to business school not art school! So here is my premise – selling art (or anything for that matter) is like selling potato chips, you do the basic things, you do them right and you have a chance to succeed. Don’t do them and you are set for failure.

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Don’t Forget the Little Things – Like Business Cards!

The Introduction

Think of your business card as more than something you leave behind after meeting someone. Make it an extension of your brand and your story

You need a good business card and I put emphasis on “Good”!  I have met many artisans in casual situations and even at art fairs who don’t have a business card.  Not only do they miss out on future sales they are not giving their brand a professional image that says, “I mean business!”.  Here are some ideas and tips on putting your business card to work for you.

 

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Art Marketing – What are Your Really Selling?

Farmers Market

What are you selling, what products are selling more, selling less…

If you have been following the series of articles on the basics of Art Marketing you already know that a traditional way to describe marketing is called the Four P’s. The Four P’s are: Product, Price, Place (Distribution) and Promotion.  In this article we will take a look at the Product part of this marketing model and answer the question – “What are you selling?”

My Artrepreneurship students at the Center for Innovation at Metropolitan State University of Denver are required to prepare their Product List as one of the first steps in developing their business and marketing plans. At first glance this seems easy, but trust me, it will require some thinking and examination into what products you make, what they are used for and who the end user is. The process usually goes something like this:

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